A chemical in wasp venom might kill cancer cells and leave healthy cells alone.

Wasps.

Pictured here: bees, not wasps. But you probably don’t care because Nic Cage getting attacked by a swarm of anything is hilarious. GIF from “The Wicker Man.”

Recent scientific research from a new study published in the Biophysical Journal suggests a certain type of wasp might be good for more than torturing Nicolas Cage.

Yep, there’s evidence that an ingredient in the venom of at least one species of wasp can target, and seriously mess up, cancer cells (in a good way).

According to researchers:

The antimicrobial peptide Polybia-MP1 (IDWKKLLDAAKQIL-NH2), or simply MP1, has unexpectedly been shown to exhibit selective inhibition against several types of cancerous cells and therefore could prove advantageous in the development of novel chemotherapies. Extracted from the Brazilian wasp Polybia paulista, MP1 has a broad spectrum of bactericidal activities against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria without being hemolytic and cytotoxic.

Which means … what, exactly?

Basically, the wasp venom chemical attacks the cell membranes of cancer cells, which exposes and, ultimately, kills them.

Nic Cage’s best self. GIF from “The Michael McIntyre Chat Show.”

This is a good reason to make sure we don’t accidentally kill all the wasps.

Again, bees. Still funny. GIF from “The Wicker Man.”

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/a-chemical-in-wasp-venom-might-kill-cancer-cells-and-leave-healthy-cells-alone?c=